gurl:

8 Ways You’re Perpetuating Bullying Without Realizing It

Making Rude Comments About Someone Else’s Appearance: We’ve all made a rude comment about someone’s outfit because we thought that we were being funny. None of us has been appointed the fashion police and the age old saying that if we don’t have anything nice to say don’t say anything all still applies.

gurl:

8 Ways You’re Perpetuating Bullying Without Realizing It

Making Rude Comments About Someone Else’s Appearance: We’ve all made a rude comment about someone’s outfit because we thought that we were being funny. None of us has been appointed the fashion police and the age old saying that if we don’t have anything nice to say don’t say anything all still applies.

girlsinthestacks:

Two authors, one video!! The absolutely AMAZING Marie Lu and Alaya Dawn Johnson answer our tough question: if you woke up tomorrow as a book character, who would you be? (Trust us, this isn’t an easy question!)

(via yaseriesinsiders)

Once Upon a Time: Modern YA Books and Their Fairy Tale Counterparts

poisonedapplespoems:

(originally published at bookish.com)

October 20, 2014
In my recent YA poetry collection Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty, I draw connections between modern teenaged girls’ lives and fairy tales, and I’m not talking about the happily-ever-after parts. I’m talking about when a girl wants to venture out into the world but keeps getting shoved back into the ashes. Or when she’s offered a version of reality that looks delicious, only to discover later that it has a deadly bite.

Fairy tales pop up everywhere these days—in books and movies and TV shows. Sometimes I find them in places where I didn’t notice them at first. The other day I was thinking about some of my favorite contemporary young adult novels. At a glance they appear to be entirely (or almost entirely) of the “real” world, but upon closer examination…

Pointe by Brandy Colbert

Like the story of Red Riding Hood, this raw and honest novel has a wolf who lures his prey with charm. It also has Theo, an aspiring ballerina and one of the most complex, engaging narrators I’ve encountered in a long time. Readers know her former “boyfriend” is a predator well before she does, and I, for one, felt a deep sense of relief and triumph when she finally stopped blaming herself for getting involved with him and realized it, too.

Ask the Passengers by A.S. King

Think of A.S. King’s main character Astrid as a reverse Rapunzel, sending an essential part of herself up into the sky instead of down to the ground. Astrid feels most free when she’s lying on a picnic table beaming love at strangers in passing airplanes. Otherwise her feelings are locked away, her romance with a girl at work a secret she’s afraid to reveal. I love the premise of this novel so much I want to marry it, perhaps in a German castle, accessible via crystal boats pulled by swans.

Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins

I adore all of Lynne Rae Perkins’s books, but this book—a Newbery Medal-winner—especially, in part because it has a lovely meandering quality, as if the cast of adolescent characters is caught inside a long, luxurious Sleeping-Beauty-style slumber from which they will one day wake up, but what’s the rush? They might as well take their time enjoying each others’ company and dreaming their way toward adulthood.
   
Dirty Wings by Sarah McCarry

Okay, it’s kind of cheating to include magical realism here, especially magical realism billed as a retelling of the Persephone myth, but let me explain! More than anything, the “realism” in this exquisitely told tale of opposites—a sheltered piano prodigy and a street-wise runaway—reminds me of Grimm’s Snow-White and Rose-Red. Maia and Cass are like sisters. They complement each other. Hand in hand, on a road trip down the Pacific Coast, they enter the dark, dazzling forest of life together.

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Much has already been written about this modern-day classic of YA literature, but lately I’ve been reconsidering it in terms of H.C. Anderson’s—NOT Disney’s—The Little Mermaid. Both main characters lose their voices, but Melinda, a victim of sexual assault, reclaims hers in the end, while the little mermaid, silenced forever, sadly comes to understand that her voice was too big a price to pay. In a way, for both young women, the message is the same: speak. Speak out. Speak up for yourselves. You are too important to fade away.

(via brandycolbert)

Album Art

firstdraftwithsarahenni:

Meeting with Natalie Standiford was like stepping into a world where all my teen fantasies about what life as a writer would look like (amazing NY apartment, effortlessly chic clothes, a separate office with built-in shelves and a bass amp in the corner). It was only made better by the fact that Natalie’s books - HOW TO SAY GOODBYE IN ROBOT, THE BOY ON THE BRIDGE, CONFESSIONS OF THE SULLIVAN SISTERS and so many more - are beautiful, thoughtful, and filled with quirky nuance. Natalie was so sweet and welcoming, and had wise, wise words about building up an immunity to writer’s block, writing about real-world fairylands, and finding creative release outside the written word.

Read More

ArtistSarah Enni
TitleEpisode 17: Natalie Standiford
AlbumFirst Draft Pod

What We’re Reading ~ August/September 2014

The Bunker Diary - Kevin Brooks
The Walls Around Us - Nova Ren Suma
Cruel Beauty - Rosamund Hodge
Ringworld - Larry Nevin
Wildlife - Fiona Wood
Love Letters to the Dead - Ava Dellaira
El Deafo - Cece Bell
Damaged - Amy Reed
Some Boys - Patty Blount

rookiemag:

Too Fat to Swim

A cautionary tale about letting other people’s opinions shrink you down.
Words by Ragini, illustration by Esme.

rookiemag:

Too Fat to Swim

A cautionary tale about letting other people’s opinions shrink you down.

Words by Ragini, illustration by Esme.