runwithskizzers:

amyzhangwrites:

pickeringtonlibrary:

Some new books to add to your 2014 TBR piles…

It’s still a great year for series, both new and ongoing, but if you’re in the mood for a story that begins and ends with one book, here are a few of the novels for (most of) the latter half of the year - ranging from science fiction and fantasy to paranormal to realistic contemporary - that have us intrigued. And of course they’re not the only ones on our radar - visit us on Goodreads to find many, many more! 

Follow the links to find copies of available books in our catalog:

Free to Fall, Lauren Miller

Everything Leads to You, Nina Lacour

Inland, Kat Rosenfield

Say What You Will, Cammie McGovern

Complicit, Stephanie Kuehn

Conversion, Katherine Howe

Fiendish, Brenna Yovanoff

(Don’t You) Forget About Me, Kate Karyus Quinn

Servants of the Storm, Delilah Dawson

Beware the Wild, Natalie Parker

Illusions of Fate, Kiersten White

Belzhar, Meg Wolitzer

Stitching Snow, R.C. Lewis

Afterworlds, Scott Westerfeld

Falling into Place, Amy Zhang

Kiss of Broken Glass, Madeline Kuderick

Bleed Like Me, Christa Desir

I SPY FALLING INTO PLACE

YEAH YOU DO

callistana:

2014 reads | Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

It had struck me then that the world was full of holes, holes which you could fall into, never to be seen again. I couldn’t understand the difference between disappearance and death. Both seemed the same to me, both left holes. Holes in your heart holes in your life.

callistana:

2014 reads | Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

It had struck me then that the world was full of holes, holes which you could fall into, never to be seen again. I couldn’t understand the difference between disappearance and death. Both seemed the same to me, both left holes. Holes in your heart holes in your life.

(via paperbackd)

lauren-oliver:

Fun in the sun at LA FOB!

Each and every one of us has the capacity to be an oppressor. I want to encourage each and every one of us to interrogate how we might be an oppressor, and how we might be able to become liberators for ourselves and each other. — Laverne Cox, at the GLAAD Media Awards  (via postgenderfemmerobot)

(via chelseyesque)

thechanelmuse:

"You write in order to change the world, knowing perfectly well that you probably can’t, but also knowing that literature is indispensable to the world. The world changes according to the way people see it, and if you alter, even by a millimeter, the way people look at reality, then you can change it." —James Baldwin

"Writing is really a way of thinking—not just feeling but thinking about things that are disparate, unresolved, mysterious, problematic or just sweet.” —Toni Morrison

"The purpose of any piece of writing is its existence before a reader’s eyes. A writer exists when she fills the blank page. A writer fulfills her task when she can be read by readers. The important thing is to write." —Nancy Morejón

"The ability to use language to effective ends, to have somebody read something and see it, or for somebody to paint an entire landscape of visual imagery with just sheets of words—that’s magical." — Yasiin Bey (Mos Def)

"By and large, the critics and readers gave me an affirmed sense of my identity as a writer. You might know this within yourself, but to have it affirmed by others is of utmost importance. Writing is, after all, a form of communication." —Ralph Ellison

"The idea is to write it so that people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart." —Maya Angelou

(via wocinsolidarity)

When people can’t apply for jobs or access government services because they don’t have access from home, public libraries must be there for them,” said Linda Lord, a librarian in Maine. “Where else are they going to go? Police station? Town hall? I don’t think so. Libraries Seek High-Speed Broadband - NYTimes.com

(via schoollibraryjournal)

hccfrenzy:

Some of our favourite YA reads for fans of history:

Prisoner of Night and Fog / Never Fall Down / Between Shades of Gray / Red Scarf Girl / The FitzOsbornes at War / Code Name Verity / The Berlin Boxing Club / The Book Thief

Let us know what you’d add to this list…we’re always looking for recommendations!

(via teenlibrariantoolbox)

Everyone you idolize wakes up scared to be themselves sometimes. — Pete Wentz (dec. 2005)

(via allcameundonethemomentyoumeantit)

flavorpill:


[Cheryl] Strayed is the rare type of writer who is both critically and commercially embraced, but also keeps her feet firmly planted in the literary world. Strayed has found the success most people will never know, but she working like she still has something to prove. It’s something that keeps readers interested, and even the snobbiest writers can still appreciate her work ethic (plus, when Oprah’s on your side, the world is yours).

The Cheryl Strayed Effect: How the ‘Wild’ Author Became a Publishing Hero, and Why it’s a Good Thing

flavorpill:

[Cheryl] Strayed is the rare type of writer who is both critically and commercially embraced, but also keeps her feet firmly planted in the literary world. Strayed has found the success most people will never know, but she working like she still has something to prove. It’s something that keeps readers interested, and even the snobbiest writers can still appreciate her work ethic (plus, when Oprah’s on your side, the world is yours).

The Cheryl Strayed Effect: How the ‘Wild’ Author Became a Publishing Hero, and Why it’s a Good Thing

What is interesting, is that the Frida Kahlo venerated by American feminists is a very different Frida Kahlo to the one people learn about in Mexico, in the Chicano community. In her country, she is recognized as an important artist and a key figure in revolutionary politics of early 20th century Mexico. Her communist affiliations are made very clear. Her relationship with Trotsky is underscored. All her political activities with Diego Rivera are constantly emphasized. The connection between her art and her politics is always made. When Chicana artists became interested in Frida Kahlo in the ‘70s and started organizing homages, they made the connection between her artistic project and theirs because they too were searching for an aesthetic compliment to a political view that was radical and emancipatory. But when the Euro-American feminists latch onto Frida Kahlo in the early ‘80s and when the American mainstream caught on to her, she was transformed into a figure of suffering. I am very critical of that form of appropriation. — Coco Fusco on her Amerindians piece from 1992 with Guillermo Gómez-Peña (via tofunkey)

(via buffmeister)