James, deer boy, may you never have to go stag again. — Sirius Black’s best man speech, probably. (via simplypotterheads)

(via opheliet)

asker

loopylizard asked: I am writing a fantasy story about a boy who is an heteroromantic asexual. It is set in a world where they don't have terms for this so I am finding it difficult to describe. Do you have any advice for writing this character without it seeming like he is just scared of sex (or any other explanation)? Also my main character is a POC and the main woman is a lesbian trans woman. Any advice on not making it seem like these characters are just to add diversity (I didn't. They have important arcs)?

Sumy recommends this post as a starting place. (More suggestions welcome!)

asker

randompanda99 asked: Hey. I'm 14 and I write a lot in my free time. It'd be awesome if I could get published, even just through a minor company but I feel like my writing isn't that good. I also don't have money to pay for courses or editors. How can I improve my writing?

There are tons of resources available for free on the internet. Pub(lishing) Crawl, Fiction University, WriteOnCon, Absolute Write, and more here. John Scalzi has a somewhat contentious answer here, as well.

waltdisneyconfessions:

"I know a lot of people want a lesbian princess or more POC princesses, but honestly, I would love to see a princess in a wheelchair. I have been in one my whole life, and I would love for kids with physical disabilities to have someone to look up to, as well."

waltdisneyconfessions:

"I know a lot of people want a lesbian princess or more POC princesses, but honestly, I would love to see a princess in a wheelchair. I have been in one my whole life, and I would love for kids with physical disabilities to have someone to look up to, as well."

(via a-tattooed-nerd)

the problem

  • fanwriter: *racebends classic character*
  • white dudes: UGH NO CANONICALLY WHITE CHARACTERS MUST BE WHITE FOREVER
  • fanwriter: *genderflips classic character*
  • white dudes: GENDER ROLES EXIST FOR A REASON NOPE NOPE NOPE
  • fanwriter: *creates a queer headcanon*
  • white dudes: GROSS WHAT THE FUCK NO HOMO
  • professional writer: *creates original narrative featuring prominent female, POC and/or queer characters*
  • white dudes: POLITICAL CORRECTNESS MAKES EVERYTHING WORSE, NOBODY CARES ABOUT YOUR ISSUES
  • professional writer: *tells true story featuring prominent female, POC and/or queer characters*
  • white dudes: STOP PUSHING YOUR POLITICAL AGENDA DOWN OUR THROATS
  • feminism: *points out the overwhelming number of straight white male protagonists and creators, argues in favour of diversity*
  • white dudes: WHY THE FUCK ARE YOU COMPLAINING, IF YOU WANT TO SEE THAT SORT OF THING, JUST MAKE IT YOURSELVES, IT'S NOT LIKE IT'S HARD OR ANYTHING JFC
  • literally everyone: ...
asker

tcut95 asked: What do you think of people creating backstories for their characters in RPG games? Is there a specific way/style of writing that seems as though it would make for a better narrative in this case?

IMO there is no reason not to create a backstory for your RPG character if you want to. And if you’re playing the sort of RPG where your character’s personality/history have an actual effect on the game (ie not World of Warcraft), creating a backstory is probably essential for enriching the whole experience. I don’t think there’s any particular narrative style that works any better/worse, though. Just write it in whatever way flows best for you.

~ Kaitlin

hope-in-every-book:

svyalitchat:

The #SVYALit Project: Using YA Lit to talk about sexual violence and consent in the lives of teens. Here are a few book lists and book reviews.

Because No Always Mean No, a list of books dealing with sexual assault  
Take 5: Difficult books on an important topic (sexual violence)
Take 5: Sexual Violence in the Life of Boys  
Book Review: The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely 
Thinking About Boys, Sex, and Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian 
What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton 
Plus One by Elizabeth Fama
September Girls by Bennett Madison  
Discussing THE S WORD by Chelsea Pitcher, a guest post by Lourdes Keochgerien
5 Reasons I Loved Faking Normal by Courtney C. Stevens
Charm and Strange by Stephanie Khuen
The Truth About Alice by Jennifer Mathieu
The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski
Uses for Boys by Erica Loraine Scheidt
Killer Instinct by S. E. Green

Live Through This by Mindi Scott

Sex/Consent Positive Titles: Karen’s List Christa’s List Carrie’s List

See the complete #SVYALit Project Index Here: http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2014/02/svyalit-project-index.html

This is important. Could very well help those struggling to read these books. Don’t leave anyone in the dark.

(via bluestockingbookworm)

BUT THESE CHARACTERS DON’T LOOK LIKE ME

Nope, they don’t. And they may have experiences not indicative of yours. So what? What do you think everyone who isn’t like you has been experiencing all this time? That same feeling. And yet they still read Batman or watch the same television shows.

Confession time: I’m a jerky white dude. I’m clumsy in my assumptions and preconceived notions and — hey, I acknowledge my privilege. The privilege of privilege is being blinded by it and blind to it. You can walk around all day, whistling like a happy asshole, completely unaware of all the toxic douchebaggery splashing all around. We step on flowers we don’t even notice.

Sometimes, though, you have your eyes opened to it, and it’s a real holy-shit-we’re-in-some-kind-of-sexist-racist-Matrix moment. Rape culture doesn’t seem like a thing until someone starts pointing it out and then it’s a really awful Magic Eye painting, except instead of seeing a dolphin you’re seeing how we ask rape victims what they did to deserve getting raped. Once someone tells you, “That Terrible Thing is really an actual thing,” it’s ants, it’s dust, it’s fingerprints-on-glass. Didn’t notice it before, but now you realize it’s freaking everywhere.

And one of those “it’s freaking everywhere” moments is when you realize, oh, yeah, okay, our pop culture has been speaking very directly to heteronormative middle-class white-guy culture for a long time. Comics, television, novels, whatever. It’s time to share the storytelling. Time to pass the Talking Stick. Besides, maybe if we saw more diversity on the page, we might be willing to acknowledge the diversity outside our doors. I often say that the most valuable multitasking we can teach our kids and express in ourselves is to dual-wield Empathy and Logic, and if this helps in that, so be it. If this makes people more open? More aware? How is that possibly a bad thing?

— Chuck Wendig, Gender-Flip Geek Icons! Race-Flip Nerd War! Gay Batman! Raaaaar! (via doyouwanttobesaved)

(via bluestockingbookworm)