explore-blog:

Photographer Rania Matar captures the inner worlds of teenage girls through their bedroom interiors, from the American upper class to the refugee camps of the Middle East. What emerges is part James Mollison’s Where Children Sleep, part JeongMee Yoon’s Pink and Blue Projects, part something else entirely. 

anandphilip:

The future of social activism: Focus on young adults

anandphilip:

The future of social activism: Focus on young adults

A popular exercise among High School creative writing teachers in America is to ask students to imagine they have been transformed, for a day, into someone of the opposite sex, and describe what that day might be like. The results, apparently, are uncannily uniform. The girls all write long and detailed essays that clearly show they have spent a great deal of time thinking about the subject. Half of the boys usually refuse to write the essay entirely. Those who do make it clear they have not the slightest conception what being a teenage girl might be like, and deeply resent having to think about it.

David Graeber, “Beyond Power/Knowledge: An Exploration of Power, Ignorance and Stupidity” (pdf)

He also says much the same thing in “Revolutions in Reverse,” an essay included in the book Revolutions in Reverse (which can be read in Scribd at the link). I’d been meaning to post a quote from the second source for a while, thanks to Aaron Brady for the actual excerpt above. That last link is a good essay on the recent Rush Limbaugh BS and how patriarchy works and how male privilege is defended by having men like Limbaugh around to keep women’s opinions out of the allowed discourse on the subject. To keep high school boys forever unable to write essays that could relate to the issue of needing hormonal birth control to control ovarian cysts.

(via youthisastateofmind)

We talked about this a lot this year in English. Girls are taught from a young age that we have to connect to what we read, so when we do excercises in class, everyone talks about how they connect to Huck Finn, or to Jay Gatsby, or to Julius Caesar. We connect to all the characters because we have to, because if we don’t then we won’t survive through the years of school.

Boys don’t deal with this. Practically every book or story they encounter from the time they begin school is full of male characters and written by men. So when confronted with female characters of female authors, they don’t know what to do. They feel as if they can’t connect with these characters because of the gender boundaries. As one woman in my class pointed out, “girls have to connect to male characters, but boys don’t have to connect to female characters.” By the time they’re my age, it’s not even intentional: many honestly think that they won’t understand a female character because they have no shared experiences whatsoever.

(via animehrmine)

(via landsbeyond)

kateoplis:

thedailywhat:

This Is Important, You Should Know About It of the Day: Over the weekend, troubling allegations have emerged of many Iraqi teenagers being stoned to death for dressing in “emo fashion.”
Scores of teens wearing skinny pants and graphic tees, and sporting a signature “emo style” haircut have allegedly been clobbered with cinder blocks [warning: graphic images] by members of Iraq’s “moral police.”
Though the number might be lower — Reuters put the death toll at 14 — the terrifying trend appears to have at least a measure of consent from Iraq’s Interior Ministry, which suggests it could get much worse.
“[The Moral Police] have official approval to eliminate them as soon as possible, because the dimensions of the community began to take another course, and is now threatening danger,” read a statement from the ministry, which also compared “the Emo phenomenon” to “devil worshipping.” […]
[photo: nyt.]

Read on.

kateoplis:

thedailywhat:

This Is Important, You Should Know About It of the Day: Over the weekend, troubling allegations have emerged of many Iraqi teenagers being stoned to death for dressing in “emo fashion.”

Scores of teens wearing skinny pants and graphic tees, and sporting a signature “emo style” haircut have allegedly been clobbered with cinder blocks [warning: graphic images] by members of Iraq’s “moral police.”

Though the number might be lower — Reuters put the death toll at 14 — the terrifying trend appears to have at least a measure of consent from Iraq’s Interior Ministry, which suggests it could get much worse.

“[The Moral Police] have official approval to eliminate them as soon as possible, because the dimensions of the community began to take another course, and is now threatening danger,” read a statement from the ministry, which also compared “the Emo phenomenon” to “devil worshipping.” []

[photo: nyt.]

Read on.

sfmoma:


WHY THIS SHOW MATTERS: Few contemporary artists have been able to capture the vulnerable and volatile nature of teenagers like Rineke Dijkstra, who is to be given her first mid-career retrospective in the United States at SFMOMA.

(via Slideshow: Images from Rineke Dijkstra’s Retrospective at SFMOMA | Artinfo)

sfmoma:

WHY THIS SHOW MATTERS: Few contemporary artists have been able to capture the vulnerable and volatile nature of teenagers like Rineke Dijkstra, who is to be given her first mid-career retrospective in the United States at SFMOMA.

(via Slideshow: Images from Rineke Dijkstra’s Retrospective at SFMOMA | Artinfo)

(via npr)

"Portraits of teenage girls by Stockholm based artist Julia Peirone. Capturing in between moments of the in between years. Mid-wink, Mid-gum chew, Mid-hair twirl of middle schoolers.”
via Teenage

"Portraits of teenage girls by Stockholm based artist Julia Peirone. Capturing in between moments of the in between years. Mid-wink, Mid-gum chew, Mid-hair twirl of middle schoolers.”

via Teenage