pickeringtonlibrary:

We are (as if you couldn’t tell by our posts!) huge science fiction/dystopian fans here at PPL: we are tremendously excited for tomorrow’s visit with Mindy McGinnis, who’ll be talking about her dystopian novel Not a Drop to Drink! 
So of course we’re also thrilled that this year’s summer reading theme is Science! Here is a (very, very) brief guide to science fiction topics in some of our favorite YA reads. And to see these awesome book covers in full, click through the image to find our dedicated Pinterest board! 

pickeringtonlibrary:

We are (as if you couldn’t tell by our posts!) huge science fiction/dystopian fans here at PPL: we are tremendously excited for tomorrow’s visit with Mindy McGinnis, who’ll be talking about her dystopian novel Not a Drop to Drink

So of course we’re also thrilled that this year’s summer reading theme is Science! Here is a (very, very) brief guide to science fiction topics in some of our favorite YA reads. And to see these awesome book covers in full, click through the image to find our dedicated Pinterest board! 

(via yaseriesinsiders)

What Kind of Writer’s Retreat is Right For You?

Pondering the John Green discussions …

melissamarr:

So I want to take a minute to address the unfair accusations about John Green & his influence that seem to pop up more & more since TFiOS exploded in the market.  I’ve been biting my tongue, but then I saw this

TWITTER AS BAROMETER:

Tying Twitter followers to sales/influence seems a little troubling to me.  For easy data comparison, take a glance at Sylvia Day’s followers. Syl just got an eight figure deal, but she has 100k or so followers. 

John had at or around a million Twitter followers BEFORE he hit the NYT. Twitter is not a barometer for power, esp in John’s case.  He built a platform with his brother. People follow him there bc of more than his novels.   

DISCLAIMER before I go on

I like John.  He’s talented, neurotic, & sweet.  In other words, he’s like most of my writer friends.  

History & Context

I had been emailing with John back in 2006 bc I had a “pre-pub tour” & had no idea what that meant, but Googling informed me that the author of a book I’d read & liked (Looking for Alaska) had done one.   John replied with helpful answers (including commentary on hotel peanuts). 

When I met John, back in 2006 or 2007, it was the night of his Printz acceptance (for either the Printz Award or the Printz Honor— IDK which, all I remember is that he was there accepting as was Marcus Zusak).

At his speech he was sweet, but he also did this thing with a videocamera that made me come home & report to my husband, “He has a schtick that will build audience recognition. I’m not sure if it’ll sell books, but it’s away to harness his obviously non-stop thinking AND hide his shyness.” 

Hop forward in time. I met John again when we were both giving talks at a conference. I was either right before or after him. We were both nervous wrecks.  He’s just a guy, a writer with the same anxiety as the rest of us.

Again, we were at a conference. We were on a panel with the lovely Sara Zarr & partway in got derailed because John (wrongly) implied that Fitzgerald was more pertinent than Faulkner.  I don’t recall the topic, but seriously? Faulkner is always better. *head shaking*

Back then, John was either at or approaching a million twitter followers. He hadn’t hit the NYT yet though.  Was the YA world bending to his will? Did he have a villainous lair? No. He had people who were intrigued by his mind, his somewhat manic gesticulating, & his quirky topic selection.  I think the best way to look at it is that John was establishing TWO careers—public personality of Many Opinions and literary writer.  Lots of people watched his vlogs, but didn’t buy his books.  Some of us really couldn’t care less about his vlogs (sorry, John!), but love his writing. 

Articles & accusations that his Twitter followers are relevant to his influence on YA are missing the history.  

THE CRUX of it all:

Does John have influence? Sure, but he built it not just as a writer but as John & Hank.

Now on to the key topic that sparked this pondering post—Is his influence because he has different bits? I’m going to say nope. 

Seriously, folks, he has a Printz AND a Printz Honor. I get that his last book launched him into mainstream notice, but for those of us who were watching waaaaaay before that, I think there are some other factors at play here. 

a) He had a schtick that built reach to potential readers (i.e. the general public) AND

b) he writes gorgeous literary prose (which influences industry folks).

I’m not saying his gender is irrelevant. I do get the very valid patterns that male authors do tend to get more media coverage & thus more buzz & (potentially) more sales, but

1) that’s not HIS fault,

and

2) let’s not ignore the specifics of John Green’s ascent either.

pageturnersblog:

@RLLaFevers’s Mortal Heart, His Fair Assassin book 3, gets a cover! Head over to ShaeLit for a chance to win an ARC and to learn more 


SO excited for this one!!

pageturnersblog:

@RLLaFevers’s Mortal Heart, His Fair Assassin book 3, gets a cover! Head over to ShaeLit for a chance to win an ARC and to learn more 

SO excited for this one!!

epicreads:

ROMANTIC YA FOR THE WIN! [Source]
The Distance Between Us by Kasie West
Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller
How to Love by Katie Cotugno
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
Rock and A Hard Place by Angie Stanton
My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Crash by Nicole Williams
Open Road Summer by Emery Lord
If I Stay by Gayle Forman 
The Sky is Everywhere by Jandi Nelson
Perfect Chemistry by Simone Elkeles
The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han
Aristotle & Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Saenz
Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta
Every Day by David Levithan
The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
The Sea of Tranquility by Katja Millay
The Trouble with Flirting by Claire LaZebnik
Sloppy Firsts by Megan McCafferty 
If We Kiss by Rachel Vail
Love and Leftovers by Sarah Tregay
The Promise of Amazing by Robin Constantine
The Book of Broken Hearts by Sarah Ockler
How Zoe Made Her Dreams (Mostly) Come True by Sarah Strohmeyer
Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have) by Sarah Mlynowski
Street Love by Walter Dean Myers
Nobody But Us by Kristin Halbrook
If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan
Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

epicreads:

ROMANTIC YA FOR THE WIN! [Source]

The Distance Between Us by Kasie West

Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller

How to Love by Katie Cotugno

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Rock and A Hard Place by Angie Stanton

My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick

Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver

Crash by Nicole Williams

Open Road Summer by Emery Lord

If I Stay by Gayle Forman 

The Sky is Everywhere by Jandi Nelson

Perfect Chemistry by Simone Elkeles

The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han

Aristotle & Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Saenz

Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta

Every Day by David Levithan

The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith

The Sea of Tranquility by Katja Millay

The Trouble with Flirting by Claire LaZebnik

Sloppy Firsts by Megan McCafferty 

If We Kiss by Rachel Vail

Love and Leftovers by Sarah Tregay

The Promise of Amazing by Robin Constantine

The Book of Broken Hearts by Sarah Ockler

How Zoe Made Her Dreams (Mostly) Come True by Sarah Strohmeyer

Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have) by Sarah Mlynowski

Street Love by Walter Dean Myers

Nobody But Us by Kristin Halbrook

If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

(via kristinhalbrook)

Will we see a lesbian Hunger Games in the future? A transgender Percy Jackson series? I wouldn’t have believed so when I was growing up, but based on the remarkable progress we have made, I believe it is not just possible but inevitable now. — Author Andrew J. Peters’s guest post on YA Highway: Waiting on the Breakthrough LGBT Hero

YA Author Directory

We’ve just updated our list of YA authors on Tumblr!

If you’re an author who would like to be added, send us an email at yahighway at gmail dot com. And if you spot someone we left out, send us a note or an ask or a tweet or whatever other mode of communication floats your boat.

Except for phone calls. Never phone calls. *shudder*

This morning it was announced that YA Highwayer Stephanie Kuehn’s debut novel, CHARM & STRANGE, has been named the 2014 Morris Award winner! The William C. Morris YA Debut Award, first awarded in 2009, “honors a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens and celebrating impressive new voices in young adult literature.”We are so thrilled for Steph, and proud of her, too. CHARM & STRANGE is a beautiful book and well deserving of any and all honors!

This morning it was announced that YA Highwayer Stephanie Kuehn’s debut novel, CHARM & STRANGE, has been named the 2014 Morris Award winner! The William C. Morris YA Debut Award, first awarded in 2009, “honors a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens and celebrating impressive new voices in young adult literature.”

We are so thrilled for Steph, and proud of her, too. CHARM & STRANGE is a beautiful book and well deserving of any and all honors!