I’m really proud of Panic. I think readers should know that. And also, there are tigers in it!! Delirium had cows, Panic had tigers. I think my next book might have a duck. I’m still undecided on that one; it seems like kind of a letdown. Lauren Oliver
YA did something amazing for literature. It made it accessible to all readers. We didn’t need an education to adore and understand literary fiction (The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks) or a million pages of backstory or world building to establish a science fiction universe (Feed) or a fat fantasy to be, like, 1500-pages-fat (each of the Lumatere Chronicles sits around a humble 500). But the thing is, this kind of accessible fiction isn’t just for teen readers. Adult readers found a love for Young Adult as well. And we want more. We want the style of YA to translate over to adult situations. I feel like this is where NA can plant its flag into the ground. — “In Defense of New Adult" by Sarah Harian

First Draft: Behind the Podcast

firstdraftwithsarahenni:

                                           image

From July 1 to Sept. 5, I drove more than 6,000 miles and recorded more than 40 interviews with authors for what has become the First Draft podcast series. It was a lemonade-from-lemons desperation project, and one of the most insane things I’ve ever done. Though my hopes were sky-high (a life-changing road trip of staggering importance!), it exceeded expectations.

Many forces converged to make a great escape palatable: My marriage took a southward turn; after a couple close calls, my book did not sell; my day job is still a typical, dull day job; and I realized that being 3,000 miles away from my family and the Pacific Ocean for six years had taken a big toll on my happiness.

So I decided to do something that would shake up every corner of my life.

Read More

(via ricktransitgloriamundi)

YA Author Directory

yahighway:

We’ve just updated our list of YA authors on Tumblr!

If you’re an author who would like to be added, send us an email at yahighway at gmail dot com. And if you spot someone we left out, send us a note or an ask or a tweet or whatever other mode of communication floats your boat.

Except for phone calls. Never phone calls. *shudder*

It’s been awhile since we’ve updated this list — if you want to be listed, let us know! And if you just want to follow some individual Highwayers, here we are:

Sumayyah Daud
Debra Driza
Sarah Enni
First Draft with Sarah Enni podcast
Kristin Halbrook
Kate Hart
Kirsten Hubbard
Stephanie Kuehn
Amy Lukavics
Kristin Otts
Kaitlin Ward

former or on hiatus members:

Kody Keplinger
Phoebe North
Veronica Roth
Michelle Schusterman

Stephanie Kuehn and the ladies of YA Highway share their stories of that YA book staple: first cars.

As a young book-devourer, the first “Muslim” YA novel I read was a Jewish one - a Judy Blume. Until that moment, I’d read books with the firm expectation that they should take me away into another world.

To be, for the first time, taken into my own world was eye-opening. There were actually other girls out there who balanced friendships at their synagogues (mosques) with friendships at school? Girls who worried about how much of their Jewish (Muslim) selves they should introduce to their “regular” friends?

I wasn’t the only one who felt like me?

From Jewish (Muslim) to Ms. Marvel: A Brief Survey of YA with Muslim Characters, by Sajidah
I’ll let myself write the wrong thing, the right thing, the thing too tangled to distinguish as either until later. I’ll let myself write something that fails if I need to, so that I can transform it later into something which succeeds. Today I’ll let myself write badly, if that’s how the words are coming out. Because bad words are better than no words. And because without letting myself write badly, I cannot let myself write at all. — “On Getting Things Wrong,” by Leila Austin
Check out the awesome cover for Michelle Falkoff’s contemporary YA debut, Playlist for the Dead — and click through to enter the giveaway for a signed ARC!
Here’s a little more about the book:

Here’s what Sam knows: There was a party. There was a fight. The next morning, his best friend, Hayden, was dead. And all he left Sam was a playlist of songs, and a suicide note: For Sam—listen and you’ll understand.

 As he listens to song after song, Sam tries to face up to what happened the night Hayden killed himself. But it’s only by taking out his earbuds and opening his eyes to the people around him that he will finally be able to piece together his best friend’s story. And maybe have a chance to change his own.

Add on GoodreadsPreorder at Barnes and Noble

Check out the awesome cover for Michelle Falkoff’s contemporary YA debut, Playlist for the Dead — and click through to enter the giveaway for a signed ARC!

Here’s a little more about the book:

Here’s what Sam knows: There was a party. There was a fight. The next morning, his best friend, Hayden, was dead. And all he left Sam was a playlist of songs, and a suicide note: For Sam—listen and you’ll understand.

 As he listens to song after song, Sam tries to face up to what happened the night Hayden killed himself. But it’s only by taking out his earbuds and opening his eyes to the people around him that he will finally be able to piece together his best friend’s story. And maybe have a chance to change his own.

Add on Goodreads
Preorder at Barnes and Noble

What We Read ~ July/August 2014

How To Love - Katie Cotugno
Chime - Frannie Billingsley
Citrus County - John Brandon
Kushiel’s Scion - Jacqueline Carey
Servants of the Storm - Delilah Dawson
Isla and the Happily Ever After - Stephanie Perkins
Dirty Wings - Sarah McCarry
Midwinterblood - Marcus Sedgwick
Amity - Micol Ostow